Emerging Science Electives

Students can study emerging science electives in fields such as nanotechnology, astrophysics, pharmaceutical science and bioinformatics.

Cutting edge of contemporary knowledge and practice.

Through our partnership with Monash University, all Year 10 students are able to undertake an extended science research project with guidance from expert mentors.

Analytical Spectroscopy

Curriculum Focus

This unit will explore the analytical and spectroscopic techniques used in chemistry. These essential techniques are currently used to qualitatively and quantitatively identify chemicals, such as salt content in water, molecular components in vegetable juices and petrol.

Chromatography is a technique that is used to separate the substances present in a mixture and is widely used to determine the identity of these substances. Its applications include the detection of drugs present in blood and hydrocarbons in oil.

All forms of spectroscopy use a part of the electromagnetic spectrum to give vital information on the tested material. The varying parts of electromagnetic radiation interact with differing parts of the material and by analysing the data, valuable information is obtained on the qualitative and quantitative nature of the material. The spectroscopic applications include the concentration of minerals in water, the determination of blood alcohol limits in drivers, forensic analysis of paints, dyes and fibre samples.

Titration is a volumetric analysis technique that enables accurate measures of the concentration of the unknown solution to be determined. This technique is used to find the concentrations of acids and bases.

This unit focuses on some of the experimental techniques used in future units of chemistry and will access the university’s chemistry laboratories to enhance the understanding of the techniques.

Learning Outcomes

  • At the completion of this unit students will be expected to:
  • Understand the principles of chromatography;
  • Apply these principles to the interpretation of data from thin-layer chromatography (TLC), gas chromatography (GC) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC);
  • Understand the principles of spectroscopy;
  • Apply these principles to the interpretation of data from flames tests, atomic emission spectroscopy (AES), atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS), colorimetry, UV-visible spectroscopy and infrared spectroscopy (IR);
  • Understand the basic analytical principles of titration;
  • Use chemical titration equipment;
  • Apply these principles to the interpretation of data from simple chemical titrations.

Assessment

  • Laboratory practical work
  • Research report based on one of the spectroscopic techniques
  • Practical tests
  • Exam

Astrophysics

Curriculum Focus

Students will grapple with the nature of time, space and energy as they work towards determining the possibilities of encountering alien life in our Galaxy and beyond.
At the same time, students will be exposed to up-to-date research into the Solar System and Extrasolar planets. They will learn about the fundamental requirements for life and identify characteristics that define intelligence.
Students will explore the driving factors that lead to the evolution of a planetary civilisation and then explore possible future civilisation types and their energy requirements. The course will delve into the realms of science fiction as topics such as interstellar travel, communication with alien civilisations, the colonisation of other worlds and time travel are all explored in depth.
By studying this subject, students will gain a better appreciation for the mystery and beauty of our existence in the Universe.

Learning Outcomes

At the completion of this unit students will have an appreciation of the major themes in the areas of astrophysics and cosmology. This will include:
• The Big Bang and possible fates of the Universe;
• Stellar Evolution and Black Holes;
• The Solar System and Extrasolar Planets;
• The Drake Equation;
• Factors that lead to and are necessary for the development of life;
• Civilisation Types;
• Space travel;
• Einstein’s Special Theory of Relativity and time travel; and,
• The possibility and nature of Artificial Intelligence.

Assessment

• Individual and group project tasks
• Semester examination

Aquatic Fieldwork Science

Curriculum Focus

This unit will explore freshwater and marine ecosystems. It will have a strong focus on using fieldwork techniques to help us to determine the physical, chemical and biological characteristics and interactions of selected aquatic environments. A diverse range of environments are explored through a local and global context and students will also learn about cutting-edge research in aquatic sciences.
The organisms which inhabit aquatic habitats will be examined through student-centered inquiries into the unique aspects of form and function which enable these organisms to specialise to live in various aquatic environments. Aspects of their amazing diversity and fascinating interactions with other species to create ecosystems are also studied.
Student research is complimented with classroom activities, fieldwork, and laboratory lessons centered on sampling, microscopy and organism dissection skills. Learning is through observation, discussion, hypothesis, examination of the evidence, listening and questioning – useful skills for the Extended Experimental Investigations students will undertake in Semester Two Core Science classes. Students will present some of their fieldwork findings and dissection skills at the Enrichment Science Night in Term 2.
This class is multidisciplinary, incorporating some aspects of physics, and analytical and spectroscopic techniques used in chemistry. For example, we can qualitatively and quantitatively identify chemicals using colorimetry to analyse mineral content in water, and then consider how these affect which biological organisms can live there. Aquatic fieldwork techniques such as capture & release, surveys, and identification will also be explored. Students also have access to a variety of experts through fieldwork and presentations from guest scientists at Monash University and other institutions.
Students will also consider and critique human impacts on aquatic life as well as issues of sustainability and the conservation in the effective management of aquatic resources. The adverse implications of human practices such as pollution, oil spills, and climate change are also examined. Sustainability is explored through the notion that current and future generations are responsible for building upon our prior knowledge of freshwater and ocean ecosystems and their potential to help meet the future needs of the world.

Learning Outcomes

The practical components of the subject include laboratory exercises, day trips or excursions, and modeling activities. These will enable students to see or experience first-hand how aquatic biologists carry out their research.
Students will undertake individual and team-based projects and investigations. The laboratory exercises and field trips will enhance student skills in scientific inquiry and method, teamwork, data gathering and analysis, report writing, problem-solving, and presentation skills.

Assessment

• Fieldwork and Dissections/Lab Book
• Research Projects
• Team Oral Presentations
• Tests
• Exam

Biotechnology

Curriculum Focus

This subject explores how we use technology to understand genetic codes.
The sequence for an individual or species can now be generated quickly and cheaply, resulting in an explosion of information. Students will develop skills to decipher this information and further understand the code for life.
Throughout the semester, students will explore:
• Genetics in history, placing Bioinformatics in context within a broader field;
• The structure and function of the cell, DNA and proteins;
• The biological and social aspect of genetic disorders;
• The development of genetic technology.

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this unit, students will have learnt about various aspects of bioinformatics. More specifically, students will gain a basic understanding of each of the techniques involved in producing and analysing a genetic sequence.
Furthermore, students will learn the potential for bioinformatics to facilitate the development of new drug designs and therapies. Students will gain practical experience in state of the art laboratory techniques, learn more about the scientific method, and work with others to develop skills for effective communication and teamwork.
This subject has good support from many Monash staff and external scientists, which means that students have access to many guest visitors, as well as visits to Monash University and beyond.

Assessment 

A key skill for scientists is effective communication. To promote this, students will be required to present their findings as a scientist would, as well as write reports on guest speakers and research topics. Assessment will also include practical reports, research presentations, topic tests and an examination.
There will be two major research projects during the semester.
The first project is a research task where students choose a genetic-based topic of their interest, where students prepare a grant proposal as one would do in the research profession
For the second project, students will explore a specific genetic technology and present their findings at an exhibition evening. In addition to producing a professional final submission, both projects place a strong emphasis on documenting and planning the research process.

Disease, Disorders and Scientific Discoveries - NEW IN 2021

Disease, Disorders and Scientific Discoveries! – TBC

 

FLEET Science

Curriculum Focus

This unit will use recent discoveries in quantum physics, and exciting current Australian research, to introduce students to scientific concepts both old and new, including:
• the transformative effect of computing on human society;
• 0s and 1s: the binary structure that underlies computation, and the ‘transistors’ that make it work;
• Moore’s Law: the remarkable, decades-long success story of shrinking silicon-based technology;
• Resistive heating and energy use;
• Exciting new physics, including ‘topological’ materials that are becoming increasingly important in many areas of physics.

Since the silicon-chip revolution of the 1960s, computing has transformed society. Underlying that transformation has been the remarkable success story of Moore’s Law, whereby the size of electrical components has halved every 18 months.
But Moore’s Law is ending. Basic limitations of physics mean we are running out of options for smaller, more energy efficient electronics.
For computing to continue to grow, we must discover completely new, more efficient forms of electronics.
Cutting-edge Australian research seeks solutions using new fields of physics that allows electrical current to flow with almost no wasted dissipation of energy.
Students will visit working laboratories, use tactile, hands-on learning aids, and speak with scientists from three Melbourne universities, discovering the role played by nanofabrication (RMIT), ultra-cold physics (Swinburne) and atomic-scale microscopy (Monash).
The unit will leverage wide-ranging research partnerships with new ARC Centre of Excellence FLEET to visit working labs and meet working scientists at Monash, RMIT, Swinburne, the Australian Synchrotron and Melbourne Centre for Nanofabrication.

Learning Outcomes

Students will learn the transformative role of computation in society, and the remarkable success of decades of semiconductor scientists in developing ever-smaller, ever-faster electronics.
Students will use tactile props such as mechanical switches, 1950s glass valves and modern iPhone chips to cement knowledge of the binary switching logic that underlies all computing.
Students will develop a first, working knowledge of topological materials, and their importance in multiple areas of science.
Studying energy use in current silicon-based technology, students will cement knowledge of resistive heating and energy loss.
Exposure to the results of applied quantum physics will allow students to develop a first knowledge of quantum fundamentals without need for mathematical understanding. Namely, spin and wave/particle duality.
Visits to working labs and face-to-face contact with working researchers will allow students to connect theory to practice, and be able to explain the role of nanofabrication, ultra-cold science and 2D materials.
Students will be able to explain the role of different measurement techniques (mechanical and electronic), such as synchrotron light, scanning tunneling microscopes and AFM.

Assessment

  • • Lab work
    • One research report and one oral exam,
  • choosing two of:
    – transformative effect of computation
    – Moore’s Law
    – topology/topological materials
    – what might future computing be used for?
    – what could zero-energy electronics do?
  •  Tests
  •  Exam

Materials Science & Engineering

Curriculum Focus

Are you interested in knowing more about the “stuff” around you and what “stuff” may be made of in the future? Materials Science is a multidisciplinary subject that draws on areas of chemistry, physics and engineering. The subject focuses on the exploration of material properties and the future of materials science, with a particular emphasis on additive manufacturing (3D printing).

Students can expect a “hands on” approach to learning ranging from the use of models and simple practical activities through to student designed experiments. A feature of the course is the opportunity for students to design their own product prototype using a user-friendly CAD program and have it 3D printed.

Through our links with Monash University School of Materials Science and Engineering, students will be exposed to traditional and cutting edge technologies in the field of materials science, and hear from researchers at the tops of their fields.

Learning Outcomes

Understand the link between the structure of a material and its properties;
Understand and investigate key mechanical properties of materials;
Explore traditional and advanced materials and methods used to produce them. There will be an emphasis on additive manufacturing (3D printing);
Develop an understanding of the processes involved in designing products;
Use CAD to design a product prototype for production via 3D printing;
Consider the ethical implications of materials used in modern society;
Design and carry out practical activities in a safe manner.

Assessment

Prototype design project
Research and practical task writeup
Weekly lesson reflections
Topic tests

Medical Physics

Curriculum Focus

Looking beyond the capabilities of the human eye has enabled medical professionals to diagnostically image a human body. Physicists have harnessed the breadth of the electromagnetic spectrum, electrical conductivity and sound waves to visualise images of the human body that our naked eye would never be able to see.
X-rays, ultrasonic waves and radio-waves are a selection of the tools currently been used for imaging. The advent of the computer age has meant that images can now be interpreted and manipulated digitally. Critical decisions are made both by humans and machines on the basis of this information.
Medical Physics encompasses the creation of the image, the information carried by the image, the interpretation of the image and the medical emergencies that would need such images to be produced to understand the changes in anatomy and physiology. In this unit, students investigate questions such as:
• What can we see beyond our own sight?
• How can we see beyond the skin?
• What is in our body that enables images to be made?
Students will then build upon that knowledge to investigate medical imaging techniques such as ultrasound, X-ray, echocardiogram (ECG) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Students also learn principles of digital imaging and explore the extraction of information from digital images as well as digital image manipulation.
Students will then focus on the anatomy and physiology of the body to enable them to make decisions about which imaging techniques would be most suitable in the diagnosis of a range of conditions related to the heart, pregnancy and trauma.

Learning Outcomes

Students are introduced to fundamental concepts in image perception including illuminance, luminance, reflectance, brightness, and lightness. They become familiar with and can identify the role of basic properties of mechanical and electromagnetic waves including ultrasonic, light, X-rays, electrical conductivity and radio-waves and how those properties contribute to image formation.
Students learn how a medical imaging technique of their choice works and can explain the physical processes underlying the contrast sensitivity, blurring, visual noise and artefacts in images obtained using the technique.
Students learn basic digital imaging concepts and can explain what imaging technique would be best for a specific condition. Students will then explore basic anatomy and physiology of the human body to relate why each imaging technique is an appropriate tool to use.

Assessment

  • Laboratory work – including a logbook
  • Imaging assignment
  • Medical imaging technique investigation
  • Test

Microbiology

Curriculum Focus

This elective science will provide a foundational understanding of microbiology, regenerative medicine and physiology, histology and cytology, and recent innovative strategies that are being developed to prevent/treat medical problems. Excursions and guest speakers will expose students to current research taking place.
This subject consists of several topic areas:
• Bacteria
• Histopathology
• Stem Cells and Next Generation Medical Therapies
Underlying these units is a key understanding of cell function and reproduction. The course will look at the categorisation, biology, and use of microorganisms, not just from a medical perspective, but how these microorganisms can be used for research, both as a model, and as a tool.
Microbiology is not only a field in medicine, but the basic skills and techniques of a microbiologist are required for most biological sciences. Histopathology, the microscopic study of diseased tissue, is an important tool in anatomical pathology since accurate diagnosis of cancer and other diseases usually requires histopathological examination of samples.
There is a worldwide shortage in nearly all sectors of laboratory medicine, resulting in these skills becoming particularly useful for the future.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this subject, students will have an understanding of:
• How bacteria and other microbiological organisms can be both beneficial and detrimental to human, animal, and plant health;
• Various treatments and preventative measures for dealing with microflora such as antibiotics and the growing issue of antibiotic resistance;
• Asepsis, sampling, plating, growth, and analysis techniques for bacteria;
• Ames tests, Gram staining, and other tools for classifying bacteria;
• Preparing and analysing tissue samples;
• Microscope techniques and safe lab practices;
• The nature of stem cells and their value to research and treatment;
• Recent cutting-edge and innovative therapies that use biomaterials to treat diseases and disorders;
• Working productively in small groups and researching effectively;
• Carrying out scientific procedures, accurately recording data and analysing results; and,
• Communicating scientifically, including in written, visual and oral presentations.
Students will also present some of their experimental findings and practical skills at the Enrichment Science Night in Term 2.

Assessment

• Practical Exercises & Experiments
• Oral Presentations
• Tests
• Research Project
• Exam

Nature and Beauty of Mathematics

Curriculum Focus

Mathematics is the language of the universe, the language of science and engineering. It allows us to make better decisions about our daily lives and build a better world. At the same time, it is as much art as it is science, full of its own beauty and wonders.

In this unit students will be introduced to exciting and challenging topics outside the usual school curriculum. Examples include (but are not limited to) infinity and its fundamental role in modern mathematics, visualising higher dimensions, the golden ratio and the Fibonacci numbers in nature, the mathematics of optimal design (soap films, shortest networks, travelling salesman problem), 3-dimensional manifolds as the possible shapes of our universe, the nature of numbers (primes, codes and cryptography), fractals, mathematical paradoxes, and the mathematics of card shuffling and magic tricks.

This unit is intended for students in Year 1 at John Monash Science School, but is open to all students at JMSS. Other than Year 9 Mathematics, there are no prerequisites, however a strong understanding and enthusiasm for mathematics is expected.

Learning Outcomes

In this course, students will gain an understanding of what it means to be a mathematician by developing skills in experimentation, visualisation and communication of complex mathematical theories. They will learn to appreciate the nature, power and beauty of mathematics. They will use mathematics as a universal key to making sense of the world, a key that enables them to master any other subject or skill.

Central to mathematics is problem solving. Students will be given a wide variety of problems and, on completion of this course, they will be expected to articulate both their solutions and their processes to answering questions. Specifically, students will be able to use and analyse real data to make informed predictions, calculate the aesthetic properties of nature and social constructs, and describe mathematics in the context of history and culture. Students will work individually and collaboratively on topics of personal interest and develop the skills to effectively communicate and present mathematical understanding. Opportunities will be provided to present to the school community, university academics and the general public.

Assessment

Explorative tasks
Research projects
Semester exam

Pharmaceutical Science

Curriculum Focus

In this subject the notion of what is meant by ‘From Bench to Bedside’ is explored. Students learn about the thinking and planning that is required for the development of a medicinal drug right through to how it is administered to a patient and then how that drug makes its way to its target.

Throughout the semester the students will focus on the following areas:

How drugs work;
Their effect on the treatment of disease;
Their impact on the body; and
How safe and effective pharmaceuticals are taken to market.
This unit of study also focuses on some basic aspects of Formulation Science and Medicinal Chemistry:
Formulation Science: Students learn how to formulate, design and evaluate pharmaceuticals;
Medicinal Chemistry: Medicinal chemistry is at the intersection of biology and chemistry. It is specialised chemistry that deals with how drugs work, how they are designed and how they are made. Students will gain a broad range of skills, which traverse the full range of the drug development cycle.

Learning Outcomes

In this unit, all class work and practical work completed is used to guide students towards being able to answer a range of inquiry questions. The answers to the inquiry questions are based on students forming their own opinion. This is based on the data they have collected which enables them to generate the evidence that is required to support their opinion. Students will showcase their understanding and knowledge by creating their own website in their e-portfolio.

Students will be involved in a major research project where they will research the treatment for a particular disease and present their findings at the Infectious Disease Symposium. Students will conduct this research project together with students from the Cells to Systems class.

Assessment

Class work and group work
Inquiry question research/practical work and website development
Infectious Disease Symposium
Practical exam
Throughout the semester the students will focus on the following areas:

how drugs work;
their effect on the treatment of disease;
their impact on the body; and
how safe and effective pharmaceuticals are taken to market.
This unit of study also focuses on some basic aspects of Formulation Science and Medicinal Chemistry:

Formulation Science: Students learn how to formulate, design and evaluate pharmaceuticals;
Medicinal Chemistry: Medicinal chemistry is at the intersection of biology and chemistry. It is specialised chemistry that deals with how drugs work, how they are designed and how they are made. Students will gain a broad range of skills, which traverse the full range of the drug development cycle.
Students will be involved in a major research project where they will research the treatment for a particular disease and present their findings at the Infectious Disease Symposium. Students will conduct this research project together with students from the Cells to Systems class. Assessment will be based on:

Class work and group work
Inquiry question research/practical work and website development;
Infectious Disease Symposium;
Practical Exam.

Terraforming Mars

Curriculum Focus

In this elective science unit students will look from Earth to Mars to investigate the feasibility of colonising and living on Mars in the future. Students will develop an understanding of Earth’s systems and processes and through a combination of fieldwork, experiments and practical tasks determine the steps needed to take by humankind to turn Mars into a planet upon which we can live.
Students will use analoges of Earth to research how the atmosphere, lithosphere, biosphere and hydrosphere of Mars can be adapted toward human habitation. Using Design Thinking framework, students will work in their interest area to collaboratively explore and design future systems on Mars by understanding Mars’ geological and atmospheric structure, human energy requirements and what would be required to replicate conditions needed for Earth type organisms’ survival. The project each group undertakes will be determined by the group‘s shared interests. The group projects will require students to design, trial and analyse simulations to determine the effectiveness of terraforming Mars.
Students will have access to “real” Mars rover data to help inform their decisions. Collaborative work will require fortnightly meetings to update the group on recent progress and propose then agree future research/experimental directions.

Learning Outcomes

At the completion of this unit, students will be expected to:
• Consider and justify the ethical implications of their actions;
• Understand the global systems interactions
between the Earth and its four spheres and
describe these interactions at a range of scales;
• Apply their understanding of Earth’s systems to
the planet Mars and comparisons between the
Earth’s systems and Mars’ systems; and,
• Understand and describe Mars as a planet of
our solar system including its key features
such as; core structure, climate, soil composition,
biosphere, atmosphere, lithosphere, magnetic
field (or lack thereof), orbital mechanics and
system interactions between these components.
Students will explore ancient Mars to understand how Mars was formed and how its conditions changed over the past 4.6 billion years.
Students will develop their understanding and skills in scientific literacy through unit readings, learning tasks, presentations at regular team meetings and literacy focused case studies.
An important feature of the Terraforming Mars science elective is the opportunity for students to undertake a range of inquiry tasks both collaboratively and independently. Inquiry methodologies that students will engage with include; laboratory investigations, fieldwork that may also involve use of technologies and sampling techniques, case studies, simulations, animations, literature reviews and the use of local, global and Mars Rover databases.
Students will be able to pose questions, learn and hone practical scientific skills, formulate hypotheses, collect and analyse data, evaluate methodologies and results, justify conclusions and communicate their finding. They will investigate and evaluate issues, changes and alternative proposals by considering both longer and shorter term consequences for the individual, the environment and society.

Assessment

• Poster presentation comparing Mars to Earth; including the four spheres (atmosphere, biosphere, lithosphere and biosphere).
• Terraforming Mars Scientific Investigation and Simulation Design.
• Practical Reports/Fieldwork Reports or Logbook

Introduction to Programming, Machine Learning and Simulations

Requirement
Data Science is a compulsory subject for Year 10 students at John Monash Science School. Students may choose to complete either ‘Introduction to Games Programming’ OR ‘ Introduction to Programming, Machine Learning and Simulations’ as part of their Year 10 studies.

Curriculum Focus

In this subject students will be introduced to the basics of Python programming, Data Science, Machine Learning and Simulations. Students will learn how to write Python programs to help them solve various problems. They will also be introduced to the basic skills for analyzing large data sets and how to construct various charts in Google sheets. These skills will be invaluable in the other fields of science they study. Students will also learn about how to train and test Machine Learning algorithms, and they will apply the skills they have learnt in programming and data science to develop a simulation and analyze the results.

Learning Outcomes

Develop knowledge and applied skills in the following
areas:
– Python Programming
– Data Science
– Machine Learning Simulations
On completion, students will be expected to be able to:
– write Python programs using variables, integers, floats,
strings, booleans, selection statements, loops, lists, and
functions;
– analyze large data sets, and construct column charts,
histograms, box plots and scatter plots in Google sheets;
– train and test neural networks, tree classifiers, kNN, and
k-means; program a simulation in Python.

Assessment

• Programming task
• Data analysis investigation
• Machine learning investigation
• Simulation programming task.

Advanced Chemistry

Pre-Requisites
Please note: Students must apply for this subject in Term 1, 2020 and have completed Analytic Spectroscopy for Pharmaceutical in Semester 1.

Curriculum Focus

This is a course that allows the student with an excellent prior knowledge of chemistry to further develop and advance their understanding in chemistry.
Throughout this course, students will explore the following topics:

Bonding
Ionic, metallic and covalent bonds

Reactions
Redox, precipitation and acid reactions, reactivity of chemicals, simple galvanic cells and solubility of ions

Quantities
Stoichiometry of solids, liquids and gases and Gas laws

Learning Outcomes

Bonding
This section will cover the bonding of the three major chemical groups: ionic, metallic and covalently bonded particles. This will allow the students to discover and understand the properties of the three groups, using the common chemicals as examples. Great detail will be given to the covalently bonded particles, their forces and their properties, this will also relate to the prior work developed in either Analytical Spectroscopy or Pharmaceutical Science.

Reactions
This section will cover the precipitation reactions, the Redox reactions and the Acid reactions. This will allow the students to gain an understanding the reaction types and the application of these reactions in various chemical areas. From the understanding of these reactions students will be able to predict the solubility of ionic materials, the reactivity of simple chemicals and the Galvanic cell.

Quantities
This section builds upon the understanding of reactions and leads students to the application of the reactions to calculate the quantities of materials (solids, liquids and gases) within these reactions. This will also relate to the prior work developed in either Analytical Spectroscopy or Pharmaceutical Science.

Assessment

• Topic Tests
• Practical reports and worksheets
• Extended experimental investigation
• Exam

VCE Physics

Pre-Requisites
Please note: this subject is only run in Semester 2, and the necessary foundations need to be covered in Semester 1.
VCE Unit 2 Physics is a prerequisite for VCE Unit 3 and 4 Physics.
Selection process will occur at the end of Term 1, 2020 for entry into this subject

Curriculum Focus

This VCE unit consists of two prescribed areas of study:
1. Motion;
2. Electricity.
plus an Extended Practical Investigation into an aspect of either Motion, Electricity or in some special cases, into a special area of study described by one of the twelve Detailed Studies.

Learning Outcomes

Outcome 1
Students should be able to investigate, analyse and mathematically model the motion of particles and bodies.

Outcome 2
Students should be able to investigate and apply a basic DC circuit model to simple battery- operated devices and household electrical systems, apply mathematical models to analyse circuits, and describe the safe and effective use of electricity by individuals and the community.

Outcome 3
Students should be able to design and undertake an investigation of a physics question related to the scientific inquiry processes of data collection and analysis, and draw conclusions based on evidence from collected data.

Assessment

• Area of study tests
• Practical reports
• Summary report on selected practical activities
• Extended practical investigation poster
• Semester examination

Introduction to Games Programming

Requirement
Data Science is a compulsory subject for Year 10 students at John Monash Science School. Students may choose to complete either ‘Introduction to Games Programming’ OR ‘ Introduction to Programming, Machine Learning and Simulations’ as part of their Year 10 studies.

Curriculum Focus

In this subject students will be introduced to the basics of Python programming, Data Science, and Game Programming. Students will learn how to write Python programs to help them solve various problems. They will also be introduced to the basic skills for analyzing large data sets and how to construct various charts in Google sheets. These skills will be invaluable in the other fields of science they study. Students will also learn about how to plan and develop a game, and will apply the skills they have learnt to develop their own game in Python.

Learning Outcomes

Develop knowledge and applied skills in the following
areas:
-Python Programming
-Data Science
-Game Programming
On completion, students will be expected to be able to:
-write Python programs using variables, integers, floats,
strings, selection statements, loops, lists, and functions;
-analyze large data sets, and construct column charts,
histograms, box plots and scatter plots in Google sheets;
-develop and write a game in Python.

Assessment

• Programming task
• Data analysis investigation
• Game program